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Good Samaritan - Doctrine or Parable
#1
There was a discussion about this parable on the radio recently.

The analysis was predictable. The priest, levite and lawyer were criticized.

I suppose another question could be "Who was NOT the victim's neighbour?". Maybe the thief? Whatever....

However I notice that scripture is often very cleverly composed - often with several meanings - Divine editing notwithstanding - and this, after all, is a Parable!

Suppose the parable was a commentary on the fate of Jerusalem and the Temple. It was brutalized by the thief (Nebuchadnezzar). What then could a priest or Levite do for anyone with the Temple destroyed? Becoming unclean by approaching an apparent corpse would be of no meaning without a Temple.

What if the Samaritan was a metaphor for Cyrus who santioned the rebuilding of the City and Temple while the people left by the Assyrians (Samaritans) observed? Maybe the Persian Emperor was sort of a "righteous gentile"?

Then prophetically, the new pending thug would be.... Titus?

It may be easy to over analyze the Bible, but surely any prophet, much less a messiah would have more complex parables than merely a narrative. Besides, the ocassional anti-semetic tone which is used when telling the parable - the priest and the levite, while not the most heroic, are sometimes portrayed as unrighteous or hypocritical - can be tiresome.
#2
Great though, I did not think about the temple before in this case.

So to combine it with some thought I had:

At the time of Jesus, the Temple and Sanhedrin was corrupted by Herod (jr.). According to the Roman system he could buy people into the Priesthood, corrupt the system etc.

The maybe political point in the parable is: That Herod jr. had a Samaritan mother. And by rabbi's opinion than Herod was a Samaritan.
Samaritan tradition did not recognize the Temple in Jerusalem at all, they still do sacrifices on Passover on their mountain some X-amount of miles North of Jerusalem. So they also might not have agreed with a lot of things Jesus said (about the Temple etc.).
Samaritans were a sect that didn't recognize the prophets as being very important (that is why they did not recognize Jerusalem), nor would they listen to any Messiah much. They might not have been seen as Righteous gentiles because in essence they are Jewish originally. They were just not recognized by Jews realy, nor did the Samaritans regocnize Jews, nor the new Christians.
Point then might be: That a good deed might overrule certain human invented seperation. A Samaritan might still be recognized by The Almighty as having contact with HIM. Just as if Jesus claims to have priesthood in the order of Melchizedek. Then Jesus does not go according to Jewish Priesthood, but all real Priest or Kings could do good deeds, and could be put in place by The Almighty.
So also Herod the Samaritan, might be recognized (according to Jesus), not for all the things he does. But he should not be put out of power at that moment, because he does good deeds too (maybe compared to the Romans). The emphasis of the story lies at the end on: Do also good deeds. (and maybe it's not so important to make a political war, with the King Herod because he's Samaritan.)

In Matthew 10:5-6 It seems even that Jesus makes a difference between Gentiles and Samaritans, and says not to go to both of them.
In Luke 9:51-53 It's shown that Samaritans didn't want to host Jesus because the Samaritans did not support people who went up to Jerusalem.
There are enough positive texts about Samaritans. But maybe Jesus also wanted to emphasize that there are good Samaritans....
#3
Great though, I did not think about the temple before in this case.

So to combine it with some thought I had:

At the time of Jesus, the Temple and Sanhedrin was corrupted by Herod (jr.). According to the Roman system he could buy people into the Priesthood, corrupt the system etc.

The maybe political point in the parable is: That Herod jr. had a Samaritan mother. And by rabbi's opinion than Herod was a Samaritan.
Samaritan tradition did not recognize the Temple in Jerusalem at all, they still do sacrifices on Passover on their mountain some X-amount of miles North of Jerusalem. So they also might not have agreed with a lot of things Jesus said (about the Temple etc.).
Samaritans were a sect that didn't recognize the prophets as being very important (that is why they did not recognize Jerusalem), nor would they listen to any Messiah much. They might not have been seen as Righteous gentiles because in essence they are Jewish originally. They were just not recognized by Jews realy, nor did the Samaritans regocnize Jews, nor the new Christians.
Point then might be: That a good deed might overrule certain human invented seperation. A Samaritan might still be recognized by The Almighty as having contact with HIM. Just as if Jesus claims to have priesthood in the order of Melchizedek. Then Jesus does not go according to Jewish Priesthood, but all real Priest or Kings could do good deeds, and could be put in place by The Almighty.
So also Herod the Samaritan, might be recognized (according to Jesus), not for all the things he does. But he should not be put out of power at that moment, because he does good deeds too (maybe compared to the Romans). The emphasis of the story lies at the end on: Do also good deeds. (and maybe it's not so important to make a political war, with the King Herod because he's Samaritan.)

In Matthew 10:5-6 It seems even that Jesus makes a difference between Gentiles and Samaritans, and says not to go to both of them.
In Luke 9:51-53 It's shown that Samaritans didn't want to host Jesus because the Samaritans did not support people who went up to Jerusalem.
There are enough positive texts about Samaritans. But maybe Jesus also wanted to emphasize that there are good Samaritans....
#4
Greeting JV, That's an interesting scripture that always left me with the sense of human compassion overweighing the denomination, or religious belief ; that in the end of our physical life all men's hearts will be weighed before YHVH.

Religion is much more than a name, but how it influences and changes our life. Sometimes G-D places angels before us, being unaware we are entertaining them.

I see so many churches today , ignoring the poor, and ill, and bringing forth a prosperity doctrine, of how much money you give will it give you in return. Where is compassion , for it is Yeshua's Name; Love; Upon Love; Loving G-D, and your neighbor as yourself; rests all the Law and prophets. Compassion is a universal name that breaks down the barrier between us, and finds a common ground, in which to share our faiths with one another.

Think of the world if all men did this.

I believe this scripture as well speaks of Israel, and how the world treats the Jewish people today. Most of the world nations have turned their back on Israel, continuing on their way ,seeking justification of their own religion that suits their needs.

It is what our faith in YHVH is; To love one another; It's ironic how that message has been changed throughout the world age.

I feel as well the Good Samaritan connects the Pharisee and the Sadducee;

; Luke 18:9 To some who were confident of their own righteousness and looked down on everyone else, Jesus told this parable:
10 “Two men went up to the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector.
11 The Pharisee stood by himself and prayed: ‘G-D, I thank you that I am not like other people—robbers, evildoers, adulterers—or even like this tax collector.
12 I fast twice a week and give a tenth of all I get.’

13 “But the tax collector stood at a distance. He would not even look up to heaven, but beat his breast and said, ‘YHVH, have mercy on me, a sinner.’

14 “I tell you that this man, rather than the other, went home justified before G-D. For all those who exalt themselves will be humbled, and those who humble themselves will be exalted.”


So many think their outward works will be seen by G-D and make then worthy, but it is humbleness, and charity ; those acts not done for reward or crowns that count. Charity cannot be found by just following out words, but comes from the heart, and accepting Hashems Spirit within us, through His Son Jesus Christ.
In all Man's Creation, and technological inventions and medical science, he cannot change the heart of others , left only to YHVH,

Thanks for your post , it makes one think what the message is for. It has many meanings, and metaphors , each of them as important brought out from each of us, as one in the body of the Spirit of YHVH. To me ; I always wondered if Love is more than saying words, and what you say is G-D. As a rabbi said once on this forum; It's Not what you say, but what you do, is who you are!

Blessings
#5
Great comments! Thank you.

Brought to mind some more observations.

The context was the "two great commandments" and "..who is your neighbour...". However it also implies the principle of loving ones's enemy or at least one's rival.

There were good Samaritans of old (for at least granting sanctuary) such as the Abimelechs of Issac's and David's time as well as the Pharoahs of Abraham's and Joseph's.

Currently there are "Good Samaritan Laws", yet there are also Good Samaritan Traps where the thief preys on those literal good samaritans where the thief is feigning roadside distress. The falacy of the concept , IMO, is where a very profound parable is used as doctrine - even though the anlaysis relies only on the literal narrative.

As far as the literal Samaritans go....

They often were those left by the Assyrians of uncertain ancestry - maybe Jewish, maybe not. They would fall into the trap of being fair-weather friends of Judeans - only Jewish when Judea was safe and prospering. Even in modern times it can be dangerous to help a victim who is of a minority when that minority is oppressed. Thus the Good Samaritan broke the stereotype.

However kindness, strength and truth are always traits of the sincere and devout and there is the Jewish proverb "...to save a life, is to save the world entire...".

Thanks again.

P.S.: While on the "Two Great Commandments" theme.... I heard the commentary that the Ten Commandments can be divided into two groups. The first four being one's obligation to the Creator and the next six the duty to fellow human beings. However in my humble observation the last one describes duty to oneself.

Coveting may be a prelude to sin and crime and it destroy's the soul. Even being over-critical of oneself could be a form of coveting - "...I should be this.... I should be that....". Being satisfied with one's lot and coping with one's fate is often the basis to happiness even amongst the secular.
#6
(10-10-2013, 10:52 AM)just_visiting Wrote: However kindness, strength and truth are always traits of the sincere and devout and there is the Jewish proverb "...to save a life, is to save the world entire...".

Coveting may be a prelude to sin and crime and it destroy's the soul.
Very true my friend; I think so many enemies of good use the gesture of peace; or holding out an olive branch to your enemy as a message of weakness and fear.

Many times holding out your hand to the wrong person might get bit. Jesus said in the same context in the Gospels of loving your enemy; do not throw your pearls before swine. We must not throw everyone in a big pot and think we will find peace by loving them.

If Israel's enemies laid down their weapons; there would be peace today; If Israel laid down their weapons; Israel would cease to be a nation, of course YHVH would never allow that to happen.

I always struggled with violence, believing if one attacked me I would not fight back. Sometimes showing non violence does reach a few, as a Hamas youth leader accepted salvation from YHVH [G-D]through Jesus [I believe through Jews for Jesus near the Temple Mount] by those very words; Love your enemy. He said the words resounded in his heart until he understood, and accepted The G-D of Israel through Jesus[Yeshua] as His Lord.

I reasoned if by defending many against one , if more lives are saved, overcoming one for the many then it's right, but it reaches even deeper than just numbers , but by knowing good and evil; I cannot judge another's salvation, but we are commanded by Torah to judge in the Righteousness of Torah, and defend our families, and friends. Where is the dividing line? It's left only to G-D, and how He guides us in each situation. We see a world today professing Christianity , yet turning their back on Israel , and forcing her to divide G-D's Land; it's 100% against Jesus who is Jewish and fought for Israel to once again be One with Hashem as He is.

Matthew 25:31-46 speaks of those self righteous people who rejected G-D thinking they were saved, but ignoring charity within them rejecting the sick and poor and hungry.

41 “Then he will say to those on his left, ‘Depart from me, you who are cursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels. 42 For I was hungry and you gave me nothing to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me nothing to drink, 43 I was a stranger and you did not invite me in, I needed clothes and you did not clothe me, I was sick and in prison and you did not look after me.’

44 “They also will answer, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or needing clothes or sick or in prison, and did not help you?’

45 “He will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did not do for one of the least of these, you did not do for me.’

So many Christians don't realize this scripture was about how the nations treat the children of Israel.
#7
(10-10-2013, 10:52 AM)just_visiting Wrote: Coveting may be a prelude to sin and crime and it destroy's the soul. Even being over-critical of oneself could be a form of coveting - "...I should be this.... I should be that....". Being satisfied with one's lot and coping with one's fate is often the basis to happiness even amongst the secular.
So true .Your right in the sense of accepting your own person, and not envying others, or wishing you were someone else, but it centers also on taking responsibility for ourselves . It's funny I was in a discussion about this yesterday. My wife called out a few pastors in her church group, and everyone told her but a close few ; don't call out preachers; like Joel Osteen who tells homosexuals it's okay who they are, and there could be other ways to heaven ,because many religions love their god, and TD Jakes who said Naomi, and Ruth were lesbians, and so many more who rob the poor widows, and build billion dollar houses, and have airports in their backyard and most of all ;pastors who's doctrine is off center.

Certainly anyones personal life is their own, and everyone makes mistakes, and everyone has their own burdens to bear of who they are, but we cannot become complacent with sin , and accept it as normal as who we are. We must call our false doctrine, but do not judge another's salvation,. I am not prejudice against any person, unless those who hurt others physically, but I can never be satisfied with sin, and we must struggle against it, not accept it.

Many think a peace beyond all understanding means being happy, happy happy with every part of our life , but our walk in Yeshua is a complete walk, of body mind and spirit, through depression ;which seeing the pain of this world, and children dying without any reason but hate, does not make me happy. We cannot throw out all our feelings of sorrow and pain , intermixed with joy. Our perfect life lies in our future Kingdom of Heaven where one day sin is gone, only then will I find eternal happiness. But until then I will accept all those feelings within me, and do as much as I can to correct them. I believe this is what you meant by accepting yourself as who you are, but not sin.
Blessings this new day!
#8
Thank you for your time and candid observations. Well thought out and studious. I have a lot to think about for another while.


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