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Gen 1:26 - What is going on here?
#1
This verse is commonly misunderstood by Christians as referring to the trinity. But, if we examine it closer, we will see that the verse speaks for itself, and that the context shows that G-d is singular.

1) In Gen 1:26, we see that G-d is speaking in the singular. This is important because it establishes the context that Elokim is to be understood as singular as well, otherwise the word “vayomeru” would have been used to denote a plurality speaking (they). Hebrew grammar requires verb/subject agreement, so Elokim must be singular. There are a few cases of plurality in the entire Tanakh, 0.3%, but these are the exceptions and not the rule. Don't base your faith on 0.3%!

2) Throughout the creation accounts in Genesis (Bereshit), only singular verbs are used in conjunction with Elokim.

3) Gen 1:27 shows that a singular “His” is used to denote singularity. So, a singular G-d created man in His image.

4) Gen 1:26 uses the wording “Let us create…”, to denote that G-d commanded angels and nature to follow His orders. This requires a little investigation. I list some background verses to help us understand what is going on.

Gen 1:2 - the wind/ruach of G-d over the waters.
Psalms 104:4 - the wind and fire are Hashem's messengers/angels. So forces of creation/nature are understood as angels.
Isaiah 55:10-11 - Hashem's will is accomplished always, and nature follow's His commands.
Psalms 103:20-22 says Hashem commands His angels.

So, we know that angels were present during creation, as shown above and in Gen 3:24.

The word angel/malach in Hebrew is not limited to a physical or spiritual being, as Psalms 104:4 shows. I'm adding some examples of clouds (Ex 14:19) and men being angels (1 Sam 29:9, 2 Sam 19:27). As you can see, King David is called an angel of G-d.

Here are some more examples of what the Tanakh calls angels/malachim (please look at the Hebrew for malach):
1) Prophets - Haggai 1:13
2) Death - Prov 16:14
3) Plagues/wrath - Psalms 78:49
4) Winds - Psalms 35:5
5) Hashem's commands/verdicts to the 4 corners - Zech 6:5

Putting it all together now, Psalms 103:20-22, Hashem spoke to His angels in Gen 1:26, and they followed His commands. The angels were used in the creation of man's body. Hashem called to the earth, water, air, fire, and man's body was created. Hashem supplied the nefesh and the building blocks of life.

If you care to have an intelligent exchange, please respond.
#2
Gen 1:26 Then God said, “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”

Sooo contrary to accepted translations of the verse it actually reads:

Then God said, ‘let me make man in my image, after my likeness.’

That certainly clears up the matter for me.
#3
(12-17-2013, 02:28 PM)HumblePetitioner Wrote: Gen 1:26 Then God said, “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”

Sooo contrary to accepted translations of the verse it actually reads:

Then God said, ‘let me make man in my image, after my likeness.’

That certainly clears up the matter for me.
I'm glad I could help you. Did you have a question? Examples where a plurality/group are speaking and the grammar associated with it are found at: Gen 11:3,4; Ex 5:3; Psalms 83:4. The verb used in these verses is amaru, meaning more than one/they.
#4
You always have some kind of problem.So bye
#5
(12-17-2013, 03:26 PM)mitch4Jesus Wrote: You always have some kind of problem.So bye
Happy trails to you, until we meet again... Big Grin
#6
(12-17-2013, 02:34 PM)Nachshon Wrote:
(12-17-2013, 02:28 PM)HumblePetitioner Wrote: Gen 1:26 Then God said, “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”

Sooo contrary to accepted translations of the verse it actually reads:

Then God said, ‘let me make man in my image, after my likeness.’

That certainly clears up the matter for me.
I'm glad I could help you. Did you have a question? Examples where a plurality/group are speaking and the grammar associated with it are found at: Gen 11:3,4; Ex 5:3; Psalms 83:4. The verb used in these verses is amaru, meaning more than one/they.

Your examples show multiple entities talking as one and presumably acting as one - but Gen 1:26 has one entity speaking and then acting as a group - the language is curious but perfectly understandable from the Christian perspective
#7
(12-18-2013, 12:46 PM)HumblePetitioner Wrote:
(12-17-2013, 02:34 PM)Nachshon Wrote:
(12-17-2013, 02:28 PM)HumblePetitioner Wrote: Gen 1:26 Then God said, “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”

Sooo contrary to accepted translations of the verse it actually reads:

Then God said, ‘let me make man in my image, after my likeness.’

That certainly clears up the matter for me.
I'm glad I could help you. Did you have a question? Examples where a plurality/group are speaking and the grammar associated with it are found at: Gen 11:3,4; Ex 5:3; Psalms 83:4. The verb used in these verses is amaru, meaning more than one/they.

Your examples show multiple entities talking as one and presumably acting as one - but Gen 1:26 has one entity speaking and then acting as a group - the language is curious but perfectly understandable from the Christian perspective
The point is that Hebrew grammar requires agreement between suject and verb. Since Hashem speaks (singular) in Gen 1:26, and Gen 1:27 refers to Him as "His and He", then we know for sure that He is an absolute singularity in these verses. Otherwise, the verbs used would have been like the verses I gave above.

What Christianity understands is unfortunately incorrect and not the true perspective.
#8
(12-18-2013, 12:51 PM)Nachshon Wrote:
(12-18-2013, 12:46 PM)HumblePetitioner Wrote:
(12-17-2013, 02:34 PM)Nachshon Wrote:
(12-17-2013, 02:28 PM)HumblePetitioner Wrote: Gen 1:26 Then God said, “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness.”

Sooo contrary to accepted translations of the verse it actually reads:

Then God said, ‘let me make man in my image, after my likeness.’

That certainly clears up the matter for me.
I'm glad I could help you. Did you have a question? Examples where a plurality/group are speaking and the grammar associated with it are found at: Gen 11:3,4; Ex 5:3; Psalms 83:4. The verb used in these verses is amaru, meaning more than one/they.

Your examples show multiple entities talking as one and presumably acting as one - but Gen 1:26 has one entity speaking and then acting as a group - the language is curious but perfectly understandable from the Christian perspective
The point is that Hebrew grammar requires agreement between suject and verb. Since Hashem speaks (singular) in Gen 1:26, and Gen 1:27 refers to Him as "His and He", then we know for sure that He is an absolute singularity in these verses. Otherwise, the verbs used would have been like the verses I gave above.

What Christianity understands is unfortunately incorrect and not the true perspective.

If that were true then references to YHVH would use 'El' and not 'Elohim' but as it stands this rule is only 'true' in translation and not in syntax
#9
(12-18-2013, 01:24 PM)HumblePetitioner Wrote: If that were true then references to YHVH would use 'El' and not 'Elohim' but as it stands this rule is only 'true' in translation and not in syntax
You answer your own question. Since the translation as well shows a singularity, and the context determines the meaning, then YKVK and Elokim are singular, 1 Kings 18:39. Do you think "He" means "We"?

Why is water plural in Hebrew, but can be used as either singular (Gen 16:7) or plural (Gen 1:2)? Why is life plural in Hebrew, Gen 2:6, but translated as singular?

Why is face plural in Hebrew, but translated as singular Gen 1:2?
#10
(12-18-2013, 01:49 PM)Nachshon Wrote:
(12-18-2013, 01:24 PM)HumblePetitioner Wrote: If that were true then references to YHVH would use 'El' and not 'Elohim' but as it stands this rule is only 'true' in translation and not in syntax
You answer your own question. Since the translation as well shows a singularity, and the context determines the meaning, then YKVK and Elokim are singular, 1 Kings 18:39. Do you think "He" means "We"?

Why is water plural in Hebrew, but can be used as either singular (Gen 16:7) or plural (Gen 1:2)? Why is life plural in Hebrew, Gen 2:6, but translated as singular?

Why is face plural in Hebrew, but translated as singular Gen 1:2?

Sooo the 'rule' is not always 'true' in syntax but only true in translation - nouns and verbs DO NOT have to agree in number unless these instances are 'exceptions to the rule'.

a 'singularity' does not imply that the object or entity is singular but only that the object or entity is one-of-a-kind or unique unto itself


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